!!> Reading ➽ Areopagitica ➶ Author John Milton – Anguillais.us

Areopagitica This Elibron Classics Book Is A Facsimile Reprint Of A Edition By Alex Murray Son, London

!!> Reading ➽ Areopagitica  ➶ Author John Milton – Anguillais.us
  • Paperback
  • 85 pages
  • Areopagitica
  • John Milton
  • English
  • 15 February 2019
  • 0543959856

    10 thoughts on “!!> Reading ➽ Areopagitica ➶ Author John Milton – Anguillais.us


  1. says:

    Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties I had acoherent statement available earlier but it was deleted by accident So I m going to spew this out and try and fix it later after I deal with other obligations Forgive my wandering and ungrammatical thoughts.Now I m sure you ve all heard by now about the new Goodreads policy changes and all the controversy surrounding them.Goodreads has now officially apologized for deleting coGive me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties I had acoherent statement available earlier but it was deleted by accident So I m going to spew this out and try and fix it later after I deal with other obligations Forgive my wandering and ungrammatical thoughts.Now I m sure you ve all heard by now about the new Goodreads policy changes and all the controversy surrounding them.Goodreads has now officially apologized for deleting content without notification, and has stated a new policy in which they would grant advance notice before removal of content If they keep to it, this would be a good step If they had done this in the first place, there would have been a lot less anguish on anyone s part.However, I suspect that there is another reason for this new push in specifically removing negative content about authors, and it is only partially related to the Stop the Goodreads Bullies groups and those like them It is possible that some authors have raised the threat of libel suits Now, I m not entirely familiar with internet law on defamation, but I could make a few vague gestures towards the present situation We do know that some authors I will not name names have been especially picky with reviews of their work, and would attempt to silence any criticism of the books in general This will not work.Any book or online product with only identical vague positive reviews would be suspicious No book, not even our favorites, is universally praised A marketing group might have gotten to the reviews page first Forbes claims thathas been plagued with this for a while The continuation of a process of censoring reviews would reduce the value ofas a review site for all of us customers and business owners alike Negative reviews on the book should stay.Now again, I m making another guess here but the majority of traditionally published authors have not engaged in this questionable conduct,although some have It is largely self published authors, who have written, published, and attempted to sell books outside of the traditional publishing apparatus It is a tremendous effort to write, package, edit and sell books on your own, and some books which would not normally be published in their present state are being pushed onto the market before they re ready, and in some cases, the confident author thinks that they could do no wrong When some authors receive any negative feedback, they will lash out and try and counteract it As the recent kerfluffle over the Stop the Goodreads Bullies website demonstrates, this will not end well for anyone readers, authors, nor Goodreads.Now I am against censorship in all forms, and the very rare exceptions could be things like libel suits or threats of violence If an author or a reviewer misbehaves, compile evidence and report it Make screenshots What we can and should do is to be civil and try and fight back against bad behavior by authors and reviewers alike


  2. says:

    As a book lover, it s difficult not to have a warm regard for Milton after reading this His defense of free speech is both eloquent and persuasive Drawing on history, philosophy, and religion, he puts forward multiple arguments for the free printing of books, all of which build upon one another, and almost all of which are still relevant today.And, in addition to Milton s compelling argument, we get his masterful prose To many modern readers, I suspect this will be dense and hard to follow at As a book lover, it s difficult not to have a warm regard for Milton after reading this His defense of free speech is both eloquent and persuasive Drawing on history, philosophy, and religion, he puts forward multiple arguments for the free printing of books, all of which build upon one another, and almost all of which are still relevant today.And, in addition to Milton s compelling argument, we get his masterful prose To many modern readers, I suspect this will be dense and hard to follow at first Nonetheless, Milton s writing style isaccessible than some of his contemporaries like Defoe, Swift, Bunyan, Hobbes, and Locke and farlyrical He uses his towering poetic abilities to good effect here, and many quotes are worth committing to memory.To all lovers of books and the free circulation of knowledge and opinion, let us take our hats off to John Milton


  3. says:

    I read this back in my senior year of high school Going back and reading it now, I actually got the classical allusions I also didn t remember how very Christian it is Milton bases almost all of his argumentation on the Bible, which is something I don t remember focusing on when I read it in high school.Given the current cultural climate, this is something that everyone should read.


  4. says:

    Very interesting historical speech, made by John Milton in 1644, on the freedom of speech and the freedom of press Some favorite bitsFor books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are. Who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God s image be he who destroys a good book, kills reason itself, kills the image of God, as it were in the eye In Athens, where books and wits were ever busier than in any ot Very interesting historical speech, made by John Milton in 1644, on the freedom of speech and the freedom of press Some favorite bitsFor books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are. Who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God s image be he who destroys a good book, kills reason itself, kills the image of God, as it were in the eye In Athens, where books and wits were ever busier than in any other part of Greece, I find but only two sorts of writings which the magistrate cared to take notice of those either blasphemous and atheistical, or libellous Thus the books of Protagoras were by the judges of Areopagus commanded to be burnt, and himself banished the territory for a discourse begun with his confessing not to know WHETHER THERE WERE GODS, OR WHETHER NOT Since therefore the knowledge and survey of vice is in this world so necessary to the constituting of human virtue, and the scanning of error to the confirmation of truth, how can wesafely, and with less danger, scout into the regions of sin and falsity than by reading all manner of tractates and hearing all manner of reason And this is the benefit which may be had of books promiscuously read


  5. says:

    Brilliant pamphlet in defense of free speech Some of my favorite quotes include I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race, where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul whose progeny they are nay, they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy Brilliant pamphlet in defense of free speech Some of my favorite quotes include I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race, where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul whose progeny they are nay, they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them As good almost kill a man as kill a good book who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God s image but he who destroys a good book, kills reason itself, kills the image of God, as it were, in the eye And though all the winds of doctrine were let loose to play on the earth, so Truth be in the field, we do injuriously by licensing and prohibiting misdoubt her strength Let her and Falsehood grapple who ever knew Truth put to the worse in a free and open encounter


  6. says:

    In Areopagitica, John Milton delivers a finely honed argument in opposition to the Licensing Order of 1643, which restored strict censorship laws to England Milton relies primarily on classical references indeed, the title is an allusion to the Areopagus, a hill in Athens and the name of a council who sat in judgement on that hill In a single word, Milton links the crux of his argument to the zeitgeist of Hellenic antiquity, which held a great fascination for learned individuals of the sevent In Areopagitica, John Milton delivers a finely honed argument in opposition to the Licensing Order of 1643, which restored strict censorship laws to England Milton relies primarily on classical references indeed, the title is an allusion to the Areopagus, a hill in Athens and the name of a council who sat in judgement on that hill In a single word, Milton links the crux of his argument to the zeitgeist of Hellenic antiquity, which held a great fascination for learned individuals of the seventeenth century.Milton s main argument concerns the fact that other societies, particularly Greece and Rome, did not employ censorship laws yet flourished nonetheless In fact, Milton maintains that censorship represses society by stifling innovation and discourse and debate He goes on to demonstrate that even if one could find incorruptible, pure jurors to study potential works for publication, it would still be a very daunting and unfeasible task.In addition to his classical references, Milton draws heavily on supporting evidence in the Bible This method of attack also underscores an important difference between Milton s perspective on free speech and what we con temporarily associate with free speech Milton s primary concern is the search for knowledge he s interested in the Truth as an expression of divine purity As a result, Milton isn t opposed to censorship outright he remarks, for instance, that books may be burned after publication should they be deemed unfit for public consumption Rather, Milton merely advocates against pre judging a work before the public has a chance to judge.Almost four hundred years old now, Areopagitica is nonetheless still a very relevant document today Its name, and Milton s very academic tone, may deter some people from trying to read it However, it s pertinent to several issues in modern culture freedom of speech is one, as noted above, and it also pertains to the ongoing debate over the role of copyright in digital media While copyright and censorship are distinct devices, both share in common the need to have control over a work both, as Milton points out with regards to the latter, have the potential to harm a society even as they supposedly work to protect it By understanding historical attitudes toward censorship, I have a better respect for the nuances of the issues we face today.As an argument, Areopagitica is intriguing and valuable As a composition, it s masterful Milton employs a very stable structure with a clear introduction, in which he outlines the shape of his argument In addition to his use of allusion, he goes out of his way to compliment his audience i.e., the Parliament of England always punctuating his arguments with, And surely esteemed men such as yourselves and so on This is not a loud mouthed soapbox rant but a very rational work of art, and that s what makes it so powerful.Although I enjoyed almost all of Areopagitica, there is one part where I must disagree with Mr Milton that is, I would argue that one of his points is flawed As he approaches the end of his speech, Milton opines for freedom of religion save popery and superstition, obviously, or any such practices as may be deemed harmful to society those religions should be extirpated He never gives any indication of who may determine what types of religious practice society may tolerate Since Catholicism is only recently overthrown in England a few decades is brief compared to its long reign before Henry VIII s intercession , England is no stranger to religious upheaval It s almost a betrayal of one of Milton s earlier points, where he argues that even the best intentioned of men may not be able to adequately judge the suitability of a work for print here he seems content in young Protestantism s ability to judge if a religion is acceptable or not.It s very interesting reading rational works by religious authors from previous ages, now that we re in an increasingly secular era Biblical allusions can be a powerful ally, but religions have also been overused for justification of a myriad of Very Bad Ideas It s a fine line these authors walk Milton walks it with great skill Areopagitica is an excellent piece of rhetoric a well reasoned argument can be a pleasure to read, or to listen to, as the case may be


  7. says:

    People of have never read a word of John Milton s poetry or prose are influenced by him everyday It is his view of heaven, hell, Satan, and Eden that almost everyone imagines when they conjure them up But this short essay the first serious argument in English on press freedom is built into the fabric of our Constitution We still use his arguments on the self righting principle, the notion that given equal access to the public, good ideas chase the bad ones out of the marketplace, to defend l People of have never read a word of John Milton s poetry or prose are influenced by him everyday It is his view of heaven, hell, Satan, and Eden that almost everyone imagines when they conjure them up But this short essay the first serious argument in English on press freedom is built into the fabric of our Constitution We still use his arguments on the self righting principle, the notion that given equal access to the public, good ideas chase the bad ones out of the marketplace, to defend libertarian views Everyone from John Stuart Mill to Benjamin Franklin has echoed him


  8. says:

    Truth is compared in scripture to a streaming fountain if her waters flow not in a perpetual progression, they sicken into a muddy pool of conformity and tradition. I wrote my Areopagitica in order to deliver the press from the restraints with which it was encumbered, said John Milton of this work against censorship and in defense of a free press, which was published against the background of the English Civil War Milton, whose earlier work, Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce was condemned an Truth is compared in scripture to a streaming fountain if her waters flow not in a perpetual progression, they sicken into a muddy pool of conformity and tradition. I wrote my Areopagitica in order to deliver the press from the restraints with which it was encumbered, said John Milton of this work against censorship and in defense of a free press, which was published against the background of the English Civil War Milton, whose earlier work, Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce was condemned and censored had a personal stake in this issue, and like that earlier work in defense of divorce , here too Milton illustrates his points with references to ancient history, philosophy and Scripture Though written as a speech, Milton had no intention of delivering it orally and this work was distributed as a pamphlet While revolutionary in his defense of free speech, as he was in his defense of divorce and for that matter his depiction of a sympathetic Satan in Paradise Lost , it is as difficult to overlook his class biases and elitism here as it is to forgive his treatment of women in works like DDD, Samson Agonistes and Paradise Lost. Like many classic writers, Milton felt that the privileges of government should be awarded to men only of a certain social class background This is in contradiction in some ways to works like Tenure of Kings and Magistrates, where Milton demonstrates that all men were born free and equal, but shows not unlike Rousseau some years later in A Discourse on Inequality that class distinctions arose through the establishment of social contracts and through the creation of laws and privileges for and by the ruling class For the modern reader it is not without difficulty that one should try to separate the main thesis from the flaws of the writer as a product of his times His arguments against censorship are undoubtedly strong, but I found myself having to grit my teeth at times as I read along


  9. says:

    The title comes from Areopagus, the ancient Greek tribunal It is a defense against printing licensing by the English parliament in 1643 It can be read as a defense for freedom of speech but there are great and grave important differences vis a vis what we think about such freedom in modern times Firstly, this is not about censorship As Yale Professor John Rogers pointed out in his Open Yale class Milton that there is no defense for censorship at all In fact, Milton advocated censorship in The title comes from Areopagus, the ancient Greek tribunal It is a defense against printing licensing by the English parliament in 1643 It can be read as a defense for freedom of speech but there are great and grave important differences vis a vis what we think about such freedom in modern times Firstly, this is not about censorship As Yale Professor John Rogers pointed out in his Open Yale class Milton that there is no defense for censorship at all In fact, Milton advocated censorship in several instances Licensing and censoring differs in the timeline of publishing, the ex ante and ex post In between, the public can make up its mind It is the ex ante control of printing press that Milton decried Secondly, Milton s anchoring point is Christian Protestantism, which is vastly different from the secular humanism s argument from Rights We are familiar with the check and balance argument to foster the freedom of speech through the Enlightenment But the modern emphasis on such Rights for Expression has an implicit or explicit rejection of religious restrictions Religious faith has often been casted as the natural nemesis of such freedoms How did Milton manage to argue from the seemingly antipodal position I will elaborate this point shortly.Lastly, in my opinion, the enduring power of this essay lies less in its political view but its poetic imageries One may incline to assign his theological argument to the narrower category of his time, but one can hardly resist the potency of his language The galvanizing quality of his argument comes from a swirling array of images from ancient Greek myth and Bible, forming in a riotous yet organized assault to the mimsy cowardice of the licensing ordinance This is not a decorous, highly polished, air tight treatise It has a gushing, slashing, rough hewed, galloping quality, of which I am enthralled if not always persuaded In summary, even one shares no religious belief, one can still find much to enjoy in the sheer power of English language in the hand of the fiery poetic Vulcan Now, return to my second point about the actual argument Milton did not take on our contemporary equalitarian view of everyone has the rights to be heard, instead, he argued from the Christian God, Freewill and Sin, the obscurity of human knowledge of Truth, and the presumptuous ability of selected bodies to control what is considered Truth Milton s starting point is startlingly alien to most secular moderns, given how much we are taught about the unfortunate apple eating incidence in the Garden The disgruntle against being casted out of Paradise for such an innocent offense may be the source of much of our rejection to a God who punish disobedience with such disproportional penalty Just imagine a child reaching for a forbidden slice of pizza and finding out that he is sent to the street with nothing but his undershirt and a blankie Yet here Milton acclaimed such views as foolish tongues When God gave him Adam reason, he gave him freedom to choose, for reason is but choosing he had been else a mere artificial Adam, such an Adam as he is in the motions automaton The gift of the world is to offer a dizzyingly abundance of choices, and the proper attitude and response to God s gift is through the exercise of his intelligence In fact, Milton showed his Protestantism openly by declaring the intermediating one s faith from one s own reasoning is a heresy if he believe things only because his pastor says so, or the Assembly so determines, without knowing other reasons, though his belief be true, yet the very truth he holds becomes his heresy He inveigled against the excremental whiteness of blank virtue According to Milton, human can only know Good through Evil, and this knowledge is not easy and never complete Milton described the Truth through a particularly bloody tale of Plutarch s Isis and Osiris The broken form of Osiris was torn to thousands of piece, while Isis searched all places to gather him up Such is the Truth in the world of men it is through that struggle of choosing and piecing together that we can make sense of our existence Even though Milton clearly indicates that only the second coming of Christ would put all things in its original perfection, but prior to that, the existential conditions of human is to allow the choices to flower freely, trusting both the strength of Truth and human s own discerning intelligence to approach the ultimate Truth Milton s image of Truth as sunlight has echoed through the ages The blinding light of Truth may make us stark blind if we look not wisely on the sun itself , which may have informed the canonical position of mainline Protestantism against any human acclaim for ultimate authority This human imperfectiblity may have come from St Augustine, maybe related to the Negative Capacity, the impossibility for human intelligence to arrive at the perfect Truth It is a perpetual noise band around the signal in statistical term, cross sectionally, so to speak Here Milton developed into a principle of humility and tolerance, as well as explicit hostility to the Truth monopolizing popery Emily Dickinson echoed as inTell all the truth but tell it slant Success in Circuit liesToo bright for our infirm DelightThe Truth s superb surpriseAs Lightning to the Children easedWith explanation kindThe Truth must dazzle graduallyOr every man be blind In the end, according to Milton, we all fumble in the half light, in dust and heat No one should monopolize the shafts of light of which we seek our own paths Hence let all flowers and weeds compete for our public opinion and private persuasion, but rejecting the administering officials attempt to bring a famine upon our minds through the tonnaging and poundaging of the custom house of certain republicans


  10. says:

    Notable lines from the speech He that can apprehend and consider vice with all her baits and seeming pleasures, and yet abstain, and yet distinguish, and yet prefer that which is truly better, he is the true warfaring Christian. here the great art lies to discern in what the law is to bid restraint and punishment, and in what things persuasion only is to work They are not skilful considerers of human things, who imagine to remove sin by removing the matter of sin.A man may be a heretic in Notable lines from the speech He that can apprehend and consider vice with all her baits and seeming pleasures, and yet abstain, and yet distinguish, and yet prefer that which is truly better, he is the true warfaring Christian. here the great art lies to discern in what the law is to bid restraint and punishment, and in what things persuasion only is to work They are not skilful considerers of human things, who imagine to remove sin by removing the matter of sin.A man may be a heretic in the truth and if he believes things only because his pastor says sowithout knowing other reason, yet the very belief be true, yet the very truth he holds becomes his heresy.We boast wisely our light but if we look not at the sun itself, it smites us into darkness.And though all the winds of the doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth, so Truth be in the field, we do injuriously, by licensing and prohibiting, to misdoubt her strength

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