➷ The Way of the World Free ➭ Author William Congreve – Anguillais.us

The Way of the WorldLADY With Mirabell You Call My Blood Into My Face With Mentioning That Traitor She Durst Not Have The Confidence I Sent Her To Negotiate An Affair, In Which If I M Detected I M Undone If That Wheedling Villain Has Wrought Upon Foible To Detect Me, I M Ruined O My Dear Friend, I M A Wretch Of Wretches If I M Detected

➷ The Way of the World Free ➭ Author William Congreve – Anguillais.us
  • Paperback
  • 124 pages
  • The Way of the World
  • William Congreve
  • 04 February 2017
  • 1406946303

    10 thoughts on “➷ The Way of the World Free ➭ Author William Congreve – Anguillais.us


  1. says:

    William Congreve wrote this unspeakably brilliant play at the age of twenty nine Then he frittered away the rest of his life on politics, mistresses and gout At least Orson Welles kept at it and got Touch of Evil made before drifting onto the talk show circuit and into Carslberg commercials For sheer verbal exuberance, no playwright in English even comes close to Congreve well, okay, there s that one guy from Stratford Just listen to this Out of my house, out of my house, thou viper, thou William Congreve wrote this unspeakably brilliant play at the age of twenty nine Then he frittered away the rest of his life on politics, mistresses and gout At least Orson Welles kept at it and got Touch of Evil made before drifting onto the talk show circuit and into Carslberg commercials For sheer verbal exuberance, no playwright in English even comes close to Congreve well, okay, there s that one guy from Stratford Just listen to this Out of my house, out of my house, thou viper, thou serpent that I have fostered, thou bosom traitress that I raised from nothing Begone, begone, begone, go, go that I took from washing of old gauze and weaving of dead hair, with a bleak blue nose, over a chafing dish of starved embers, and dining behind a traverse rag, in a shop no bigger than a bird cage Go, go, starve again, do, do This is Lady Wishfort, a randy widow who s supposed to be the villain of the piece, but whose invective is so splendidly bitchy that you can t help but love the nasty old broad No damage What, to betray me, to marry me to a cast serving man to make me a receptacle, an hospital for a decayed pimp No damage O thou frontless impudence,than a big bellied actress Well, it s a good thing the holidays are finally over, because if it were up to me, I d go on stuffing myself with Ferrero Rochers, reading clever comedies and pretending I m a foppish rake but, you know, without the syphilis


  2. says:

    An extract from the recently discovered Carry on Congreve 1969 , soon to be released on DVD and Blu ray SIR WILLFULL Kenneth Connor S heart, aunt, I have no mind to marry My cousin s a fine lady, and the gentleman loves her, and she loves him, and they deserve one another my resolution is to see foreign parts I have set on t and when I m set on t I must do t And if these two gentlemen would travel too, I think they may be spared.PETULANT Charles Hawtrey For my part, I say little I think An extract from the recently discovered Carry on Congreve 1969 , soon to be released on DVD and Blu ray SIR WILLFULL Kenneth Connor S heart, aunt, I have no mind to marry My cousin s a fine lady, and the gentleman loves her, and she loves him, and they deserve one another my resolution is to see foreign parts I have set on t and when I m set on t I must do t And if these two gentlemen would travel too, I think they may be spared.PETULANT Charles Hawtrey For my part, I say little I think things are best off or on.WITWOUD Sid James I gad, I understand nothing of the matter I m in a maze yet, like a dog in a dancing school.LADY WISHFORT Hattie Jacques Well, sir, take her, and with her all the joy I can give you.MRS MILLAMANT Barbara Windsor Why does not the man take me would you have me give myself to you over again MIRABELL Kenneth Williams Ay, and over and over again I would have you as often as possibly I can MRS MILLAMANT Oooh, you are awful MIRABELLasideTis the way of the world.MRS MILLAMANT but I like you


  3. says:

    What a piece of writing Comedy at best Reminded me ofImportance of Being Earnest , but definitely better than that.Highly recommended for a light reading Couldn t keep myself from smiling all the time


  4. says:

    Tedious posh people being tedious and posh.


  5. says:

    The Shadow of Shakespeare24 June 2017 Here I am sitting in the beer garden of a pub that may not be around for much longer due to the construction of a subway station, and having seen a wonderful production of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead on the big screen and it starred none other than Daniel Radcliffe of the Harry Potter fame who seems to be doing his best to distance himself from that fame, and I have to admit that he is doing a rather good job at that You may wonder why I am brin The Shadow of Shakespeare24 June 2017 Here I am sitting in the beer garden of a pub that may not be around for much longer due to the construction of a subway station, and having seen a wonderful production of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead on the big screen and it starred none other than Daniel Radcliffe of the Harry Potter fame who seems to be doing his best to distance himself from that fame, and I have to admit that he is doing a rather good job at that You may wonder why I am bringing this up on a review of a Restoration Comedy, and I could probably say no reason, but there is a reason I say that because, at least in my mind, I simply do not seem to be familiar with the plays, or the playwrights, between Shakespeare and the modern era beginning with Bernard Shaw and Oscar Wilde Okay, Congreve wrote sometime after the Restoration Period, which began in around 1660, however his works are still considered to be Restoration Comedies The Restoration Period is a period that came immediately after the restoration of the monarchy after England s rather disastrous experiment with being a republic It also came after a period of time when all of the theatres were closed down thanks to the Puritans considering theatres to be littlethan dens of iniquity from which nothing good, or pure, ever came out of In a way it seems to be quite similar to the anti Dungeons and Dragons sentiment that arose during the Eighties from the Religious Right and I still remember getting the cane in High School for consorting with the devil simply because a friend and I were caught playing the game during lunchtime However, Way of the World is pretty standard for the restoration period as it tends to be farcical and also deals with romantic relationships, but not in a way with which we would be familiar The thing is that the modern romantic comedy that we know and somewhat despise is nothing like the farcical performances of this period The play deals with quite a few things common with the time, including people wanting to get married due to the fact that they will get money in the bargain, adulterous affairs, and the inappropriateness of marrying outside of one s class Mind you, I can t really go into too much detail because, as with most plays, I end up getting lost because they can be really hard to follow, particularly if I haven t seen the performance The other thing is that the plots are so complex that, unless you actually see them being performed, they can, once again, be difficult to follow As such I can t really recommend reading some of these releases because the editors simply do not do all that much work to help us understand what is going on If only they would put a reasonable introduction at the beginning of the play, and each of the acts, it would be much better Also, the lack of stage directions also hinders me a lot, and further, plays from this period seem to change scenes whenever a character enters or leaves, which further adds to the confusion The thing is that these technically aren t changes in scenes because the only thing that is changing is who happens to be on stage The action should flow However, by breaking it up like that disrupts the action of the play Further, the characters aren t fully explained they are simply names, and names don t necessarily tell us anything about the character Sure, we are probably supposed to work this out through their dialogue, but that simply doesn t work either At least the person who owned the book I read did put some notes indicating who was in love with whom though it wasn t many However, I m going to have to admit that I am not a huge fan of these comedies, namely because I never really find such comedies funny Okay, I have been a fan of those high school and college comedy movies such as Animal House and Revenge of the Nerds , but while these plays seem to be similar, they are certainly not the same These high school comedies, just like these plays, are generally targeted towards a middle class audience, and this is the type of audience that was starting to appear at the time The other problem is that a lot of plays from this period seem to be caught up in the shadow of Shakespeare, and Shakespeare has cast an incredibly long shadow across the theatre In a way it wasn t until Shaw and Wilde that we finally managed to escape his shadow However, maybe it is because many of these plays were still written in living memory though Wilde and Shaw are becoming everdistance , where as the Restoration period is far enough back that the giant that Shakespeare happens to simply swallow them up Oh, I also got to see my football team win


  6. says:

    Confusing and poisonously cynical I laughed only a once or twice This is probably something that one must see staged in order to appreciate.


  7. says:

    It was hard not to have at the back of my mind whilst watching this, the National Theatre s performance of The Beaux Strategem by George Farquar But how unfair That vast auditorium at Southbank, the huge budget, a set that was enormous in all directions how could a play reading with 20 of props and a notional idea of costume in a 200 seat theatre compare Being a reading, this production of The Way of the World at the Little Theatre at Adelaide Uni, was faruncertain than a fullblown p It was hard not to have at the back of my mind whilst watching this, the National Theatre s performance of The Beaux Strategem by George Farquar But how unfair That vast auditorium at Southbank, the huge budget, a set that was enormous in all directions how could a play reading with 20 of props and a notional idea of costume in a 200 seat theatre compare Being a reading, this production of The Way of the World at the Little Theatre at Adelaide Uni, was faruncertain than a fullblown production would have been The cast ranged from what felt like highly professional to young and inexperienced, with the unsurprising result that the roles of the latter did not engage as they presumably should have Then there is the language, which is a challenge to the audience not because it is particularly difficult, but because we are used to Shakespearean language, whereas Restoration plays are rarely performed We wondered if we enjoyed the second halfthan the first because we were in the zone by then, we d slipped into the idiom.Rest here


  8. says:

    What, Tony, i faith What, dost thou not know me By r lady, nor I thee, thou art so becravated and so beperiwigged. Aside from the conspicuous distinction of containing the most English of English words I ve ever read beperiwigged , this Restoration comedy is also an excellent piece of work I don t think I ve ever read a play with such an intricate story We go from plot to counter plot, to counter counter plot, as the rather grasping and cunning cast of characters scheme to marry, to elope What, Tony, i faith What, dost thou not know me By r lady, nor I thee, thou art so becravated and so beperiwigged. Aside from the conspicuous distinction of containing the most English of English words I ve ever read beperiwigged , this Restoration comedy is also an excellent piece of work I don t think I ve ever read a play with such an intricate story We go from plot to counter plot, to counter counter plot, as the rather grasping and cunning cast of characters scheme to marry, to elope, to divorce, and most of all, to ruin every else s schemes Indeed, on the several train rides it took me to read this play, I was often left with a headache from following along There is so much wrangling and negotiating and intrigue, it s as if it was written by a lawyer rather than a dramatist The most tender scene is the drafting of a prenuptial agreement Also notable is the absence of any sympathetic character They are, all of them, a bit wicked and corrupt Not a single character is motivated by kindness or generosity selfishness is instead the ruling passion It is easy to write this off as an intentional satire on Congreve s times, but it didn t strike me that way Rather, I thought Congreve was attempting to give an honest portrayal of human nature, unadorned with any romantic embellishments And is he so far from the mark As Congreve says, Even so, sir tis the way of the world, sir.I m sure this play would be doubly interesting to anyonefamiliar with this period of English history Sad to say, this was mostly lost on me But Congreve is such a master of the craft that I still had a marvelous good time He is at times as witty as Wilde, and his humor is occasionally as black as Vonnegut s, though a great dealsubtle The line between comedy and tragedy is after alltenuous than we d normally like to think As the philosopher Santayana said Between the laughing and the weeping philosopher there is no opposition the same facts that make one laugh make one weep


  9. says:

    A Restoration comedy that s a still funny, and b shows that not a lot has changed since 1700 with respect to the love of money and being willing to do almost anything to get it And also, some of the satire especially when Lady Wishfort is talking about how she trained her daughter in virtue , as well as various other things links to some of the opinions in Mary Wollstonecraft s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, which I was reading around the same time


  10. says:

    Beneath all the perriwigs and face paint they were rather a wicked rabble, those Restoration period aristocrats At least if this popular play from the period still occasionally performed today is anything to go by Pretty much all the characters are either deceiving or being deceived, or both With friends like these, who needs enemies Mirabel loves Mrs Millamant Her follies are so natural, or so artful, that they become her and would quite like to get his hands on her dowry too, but h Beneath all the perriwigs and face paint they were rather a wicked rabble, those Restoration period aristocrats At least if this popular play from the period still occasionally performed today is anything to go by Pretty much all the characters are either deceiving or being deceived, or both With friends like these, who needs enemies Mirabel loves Mrs Millamant Her follies are so natural, or so artful, that they become her and would quite like to get his hands on her dowry too, but her aunt, the comic foil Lady Wishfort, doesn t approve.Similarly, the adulterer Fainall is after the money of his mistress, Mrs Marwood So the men are bad, but the women scarcely better The play opens with them enjoying one of their regular cabal nights where they come together like the coroner s inquest, to sit upon the murdered reputations of the week As you might expect, the wit is as wicked as the behaviour, and as refined as the costumes FainallNo matter for that tis for the honour of England that all Europe should know we have blockheads of all ages MirabellI wonder there is not an act of parliament to save the credit of the nation and prohibit the exportation of fools FainallBy no means, tis better as tis tis better to trade with a little loss, than to be quite eaten up with being overstocked.It can also be bawdy, though always powdered with the veneer of sophistication, like the faces MillamantAh, I ll never marry, unless I am first made sure of my will and pleasure MirabellWould you have em both before marriage Or will you be contented with the first now, and stay for the other till after grace I guess there is a shred of morality after all, in so much as the bad eventually triumph over the really bad The plot is fairly intricate, even if the d nouement is something of a cheap trick.Wicked fun, enough to lead any Puritan to pray for the second coming of Cromwell

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