☄ Alls Well That Ends Well PDF / Epub ✓ Author William Shakespeare – Anguillais.us

Alls Well That Ends Well In The Acclaimed BBC Radio Shakespeare Series, Each Play Is Introduced By Richard Eyre, Former Director Of The Royal National Theatre, And Comes With An Accompanying Booklet Which Includes A Scene By Scene Synopsis, Full Character Analyses, Brief Biographies Of The Leading Actors And Of Shakespeare Himself, As Well As An Essay From The Producer On Their Interpretation Of The Play All S Well That Ends Well Finds Helena Rewarded For Her Ministries To The Sick With The Choice Of Any Husband She Wishes Her Choice, Bertram, Is Unwilling To Have Her As His Wife And Sets Her A Number Of Seemingly Impossible Tasks To Complete Before He Will Relent

☄ Alls Well That Ends Well  PDF / Epub ✓ Author William Shakespeare – Anguillais.us
  • Paperback
  • 280 pages
  • Alls Well That Ends Well
  • William Shakespeare
  • English
  • 06 February 2018
  • 0743484975

    10 thoughts on “☄ Alls Well That Ends Well PDF / Epub ✓ Author William Shakespeare – Anguillais.us


  1. says:

    I just can t bring myself to love this play, although I believe I understand what Shakespeare is doing here He takes a fairy tale plot, adds a fiercely realistic setting complete with a pointless war and friendly fire , adds a desperately mismatched romantic couple Helena, a commoner and a control freak, a woman of great passion and intelligence, obsessively smitten with the noble Bertram, a proud, shallow boy , tops it off by giving the comedy a mindlessly optimistic title and then spending I just can t bring myself to love this play, although I believe I understand what Shakespeare is doing here He takes a fairy tale plot, adds a fiercely realistic setting complete with a pointless war and friendly fire , adds a desperately mismatched romantic couple Helena, a commoner and a control freak, a woman of great passion and intelligence, obsessively smitten with the noble Bertram, a proud, shallow boy , tops it off by giving the comedy a mindlessly optimistic title and then spending most of his effort not just making the title come true, but making it come true in such a formulaic, makeshift fashion that the reader must mentally modify that jaunty title by the addition of a dozen cautionary interrogation points The comic fop and braggart Parolles sort of a cross between Pistol and Malvolio helps out some, both thematically and as comic relief, but the whole thing still leaves me feeling a little creepy, with a bad taste in my mouth But thenmaybe that s the way Shakespeare wanted me to feel I don t think so, though I believe his intention is a littleambitious than that He is certainly criticizing the forms and conventions of comedy, but I believe he also wishes to transcend them by producing a kind of meta comedy the sort of thing he would soon accomplish in Measure for Measure In Measure for Measure, he succeeds by 1 distancing the reader by making the entire universe of the play slightly surreal, and 2 using the Duke as a God like figure, thus inviting the reader to adopt an Olympian perspective for him or herself Shakespeare tries something similar in All s Well That Ends Well, using 1 the radical disconnect between fairy tale and harsh realism in the plot, and 2 providing us with three ancient characters of good will the King of France, the Countess and Lord Lafeu who speak much about the nature of Time, suggesting the widened perspective and wisdom which may accompany Time s contemplation As I said, he tries something similar, but I don t think he quite brings it off


  2. says:

    Not 3 1 2, 4I enjoyed this playthan I thought I would, partly due to the excellent production of it I watched Certainlyto think about here than the previous two comedies I read.I All s Well That Ends WellThe name of this play has become almost a hackneyed phrase in the English language It s a phrase that hackneyed me has used countless times, since I became familiar with it so many decades ago But for all that, it s not one of Shakespeare spopular plays, and is seldom perfo Not 3 1 2, 4I enjoyed this playthan I thought I would, partly due to the excellent production of it I watched Certainlyto think about here than the previous two comedies I read.I All s Well That Ends WellThe name of this play has become almost a hackneyed phrase in the English language It s a phrase that hackneyed me has used countless times, since I became familiar with it so many decades ago But for all that, it s not one of Shakespeare spopular plays, and is seldom performed No contemporaneous mentions of the play or quotations from it have ever been found There are problems with the text the style is uneven and there s no external fact or topical reference with the drama to accurately date its composition However, the best passages have been taken as evidence of a maturity in the writer, hence it is typically placed in the latter half of Shakespeare s works, and in my collection it has been placed between Troilus and Cressida 1602 and Othello 1603 This dating makes it the 25th of the 37 plays included.Most critics have apparently agreed with Samuel Johnson s verdict that although it has many delightful scenes , its characters are not new, nor produced by any deep knowledge of human nature , and that several of the most notable are quite unlikeable My editor writing in the middle of the last century also notes that some modern readers are uncomfortable with moral aspects of the play Both this observation, and the unlikeable characters seem silly to me As always, Shakespeare, like any author, is writing for an audience, and his audience was the theatre audience of his own time On top of that, I couldn t care less about whether a fictional character is likeable really, do you Coleridge, by the way, went out of his way to defend Bertram, one of the characters easy to dislike, as perfectly justified in rejecting Helena as a wife given his aristocratic birth and Helena s station as nothingthan the daughter of a physician, basically a retainer of Bertram s father. II Shakespeare s sourceThe source of this play cannot be argued about It is based on a story in Boccaccio s Decameron The tale is found as the ninth story of the third day One of Boccaccio s female characters, Neifile, presides as queen on the third day, and thus relates that ninth tale She has decreed that the stories on her day will be ones in which a person either has painfully acquired something or has lost it and then regained it.The story she tells can be traced back to the Sanskrit dramatist and poet K lid sa in his The Recognition of akuntal which itself may go back as far as the 5th century view spoiler By the way, my GR friend Alan Powers has mentioned to me that another possible connection between the tale and Shakespeare may be a play using Boccaccio s plot written by Giordano Bruno, who had lived in London in the early 1580s Whether the play referred to is Bruno s 1582 Candelaio I know not hide spoiler III From story to playI thought for this play I d write something about what Shakespeare did to turn Boccaccio s story into a play III.a Boccaccio s charactersIn The Decameron see this PDF , there are six characters The first three are Bertrand, the young Count of Roussillion Juliet, the young woman in love with Bertrand and the King of France These are all main characters for Boccaccio.The other three characters are women of Florence a widow a neighbor lady to the widow and the neighbor s daughter, who is the object of Bertrand s desires None of these women of Florence even has a name in the story It is only the second of these, the daughter s mother, who gets much of a role in the story, for it is her to whom Juliet addresses her woes and makes her appeal The daughter, in fact, is barely mentioned III.b What Shakespeare did with Boccaccio s charactersIn All s Well, the first three characters are presented as Bertram, Count of Rousillon Helena is the young woman Shakespeare changes her name and the King of France These characters play in general the same roles in the drama as they do in the story.Boccaccio s three unnamed women of Florence become, for Shakespeare, four women of Florence The Widow is still unnamed, but becomes the mother of Diana, the object of Bertram s passions Both the Widow and Diana are implored by Helena for aid in her scheme Two other neighbor women to the Widow, Violenta and Mariana, are introduced as fairly minor characters So here we have the first noticeable change made by Shakespeare he s decided that Boccaccio s Widow mother can be combined into a single character III.c How the Story, and Play, are toldThis section is something of a spoiler, so Also, its kind of anal, so view spoiler Let s look at the how Boccaccio told the story and the length of the story that each section comprises and note the changes that Shakespeare made, together with the number of scenes out of 23 that Shakespeare uses to tell the same parts of the story I ve identified six sections of Boccaccio s story view spoiler The percentages shown for Boccaccio s story are based on word counts in the PDF hide spoiler 1 An introduction to set the scene, followed by Bertrand s leaving for Paris, Juliet s growing up at Roussillion, her disdain for suitors still pining after Bertrand Juliet hears of the King s disease, and sees an opportunity of using her father s cure as an excuse to travel to Paris 10% 3 scenes Shakespeare dispenses with the idea that Helena is younger than Bertram, so that she needs to grow up over a period of years before the story can get going 2 Juliet in Paris is allowed to examine the King, and entreats him to let her heal him She asks for 8 days to effect a cure, and also asks how she will be rewarded if successful The King says he will match her with a good partner, and give her a dowry When the cure is successful in far less than eight days , she names Bertrand to the King The King tells Bertrand who he will marry, Bertrand refuses The King insists, Bertrand gives in unwillingly , then takes off for Tuscany as soon as the wedding is over 25% 5 scenes The play is quite close to this segment of Boccaccio s story, and occupies a similar major part of the production 3 Juliet returns to Roussillion, and puts thing aright that have been allowed to slide because of Bertrand s long absence All the people admire her She sends a message to Bertrand that she will not hold him to what he doesn t want he replies churlishly , and tells her of the two impossible conditions that must be met before he will ever accept her as his wife Eventually Juliet decides to leave Roussillion as a pilgrim, with the secret intent of going to Florence 15% 1 scene Act III scene ii Bertram s churlish message to Helena is included, as is her leaving But there is nothing about her management of the estate because she is in no position to do this, in the play 4 To Florence, where she meets the widow and sees Bertram marching, The widow tells of a neighbor, whose daughter is being wooed by Bertram There are then several paragraphs where Juliet speaks to the Widow and the mother next door, telling of her woes, how Bertrand has deserted her, asking for help, promising rewards, bargaining with the mother who, though somewhat uneasy with the plan Juliet has, is convinced that Juliet has been wronged, and thus agrees to her daughter being involved in the deception Thus Juliet lies with her husband many times, always in the deepest dark, obtaining the ring and other gifts from him, continuing in this manner until she is certain she is pregnant She then rewards the mother and daughter, who leave Florence so Bertrand cannot find them again, and Juliet herself goes into hiding 30% 4 scenes Besides changing the role of the Widow, and giving names to the other Florence women, Shakespeare has sharpened the story in this segment The rather long discussions between Juliet, the widow, and the mother have been made muchconcise, and Bertram is given some stage time along with Diana Helena And a single assignation is enough for Helena to accomplish everything on her to do list 5 Bertrand, hearing that Juliet is no longer at Roussillion, returns to his estate Juliet remains in Florence until she delivers twin boys, then begins her return to Roussillion 10% No scenes A few words scattered into a couple other scenes are enough for Shakespeare to accomplish what is needed 6 The denouement Juliet arrives at Roussillion during a great feast, confronts Bertrand with the ring and his sons He finally accepts her as his wife, amidst happiness and rejoicing 10% 1 scene Shakespeare adds the King back into the play, now reconciled with Bertram but then constructs a reprise of the former King s displeasure with Bertram, who the King thinks is lying to him The last scene of the play is farcomplex than the ending of Boccaccio s story I ll admit that assigning an All s Well scene to one or none of Boccaccio s segments is somewhat arbitrary But having done the best I can, we see that of Shakespeare s 23 scenes, only 14 of them can be linked to Boccaccio The other nine are carried, on stage, not by Boccaccio s characters, or even by his story, but rather by hide spoiler III.d Shakespeare s new characters.Shakespeare added four major characters to his play In this section I refer to percentages of All s WellThese were determined by estimating the column inches that each scene occupied in my Complete Works, and making the simplifying assumption that each character in a scene is there for the whole scene, regardless of how many words the character speaks Think of these percentages as an indication of the amount of time a character has on the Elizabethan stage.The four new, significant characters are the old Countess Bertram s mother , Lafeu, Lavache the Clown , and Parolles In adding the last of these, he introduced a major subplot to the play.Shakespeare has Bertram and Helena each on stage about 60% of the play, the King of France 33%, and the Widow and her daughter Dianna about 20% each.Parolles is on stage 2 3 of the play He becomes, in a sense, the main character In fact, 40% of the play has Parolles on stage with both Bertram and Helena Of Shakespeare s other inventions, Lafeu is present for half of the play, the Countess over 40%, and the Clown about the same as the two women of Florence.In sum, Boccaccio s Bertrand and Juliet can still make claim to being the stars of Shakespeare s play The King of France actually plays asignificant role on stage than he does in the story because of his presence in the last scene But every other character in All s Well who is on stagethan a few minutes is either an invention of the Bard s, or a character from the story modified by Shakespeare III.e Shakespeare s main scenes.Of the 23 scenes in All s Well, six are each 8% orof the entire play, and collectively make up almost 60% The other 17 scenes range between 5% and 1% of the play.Shakespeare devotes acts I and II to the introductory material and the Paris scenes These two acts comprise about 45% of the play, and follow Boccaccio s story fairly closely They do, however, include the new characters, even as they set up Helena s deceit Four of Shakespeare s big scenes occur in these acts I.i Bertram, Helena, Parolles, Lafeu and the Countess , I.iii Helena, the Countess and the Clown , and both II.i and II.iii the same as I.i, but substitute the King for the Countess.The second longest scene in the play is IV.iii, which has not a thing related to Boccaccio s story the scene in which Parolles is shown to Bertram to be the liar traitor among other things that he is.The longest scene 12% of the play is the last one, V.iii Every major character is on the stage except for the Clown IV Movie TVFor this play I watched episode 3, season 3 of the BBC Television Shakespeare This production starred Ian Charleson Bertram , Angela Down Helena , Donald Sinden the King , Celia Johnson the Countess and Pippa Guard Diana I also particularly enjoyed Michael Hordern Lafeu , Paul Brooke Lavache, the Clown and Peter Jeffrey Parolles This enactment was superior to either of the movies I watched for my two previous plays The players seemed comfortable with their Shakesperean roles, spoke like they were Elizabethans, and were clear and understandable It was as if a play on the boards had been filmed, rather than a popular production for a movie audience Perhaps the fact that none of the actors was a star helped The director, Elijah Moshinsky, seemed to approach the play asof a serious drama than something done for laughs, or even as a play that would at least have a happy ending To me, this raised the play up above the earlier comedies I ve read, and also gave it a focus that I hadn t sensed during my read I loved it.This production of the play is available in full on YouTube the way, starting at around 34 minutes is the scene in which Helena convinces the King to let her attempt his healing I was quite surprised that the scene is played by both actress and actor as almost a two way seduction.V The Play and I comedy This is the first of Shakespeare s plays in my old age project for which watching the play above really contributed to my appreciation and interpretation.As I read the play, I thought about how it s come to be classified as a comedy A little research informed me that the comedy genre of Shakespeare s plays is sort of a catch all Not a Tragedy not a History so a Comedy the Problem plays being off in left field by themselves The point being that there aren t a whole lot of laughs in the play, not even of the suggestive, double entendre type of banter that was plentiful in As You Like It There is a bit of banter, usually involving Parolles or the Clown, but it s not the same type and when Parolles is involved, the laughs are always coming by another character insulting him, that is, laughter at his expense.This was brought out in the TV production very well But I was struck, watching that, by a rather sombre mood This was highlighted by IV.iii above , in which Parolles is shown, blindfolded, with his head pushed down on a table, and the soldier holding him saying, There is no remedy, sir, but you must die Come, Headsman, off with his head To which Parolles moans, Oh, Lord, sir, let me live, or let me see my death Even though the Oh, Lord, sir echoes the Clown s foolishness with the Countess in II.ii, it s hard not to feel a pang of sorrow for Parolles, who must be experiencing the terror of thinking that his life is about to end.And Parolles, after all, is not the only character with faults in the play Bertram goes without saying the King, having displayed a tyranny over Bertram in Act II, repeats the same dark fault in the last scene, as he is about to order another man to become Diana s husband Lafeu, a perceptive man, and one who earns our admiration for his kindness toward Parolles near the end, has nevertheless thrust his daughter forward as a suitable match for Bertram, no doubt calculating that to be connected with the Roussillion estate can be an advantage for him Indeed, when we examine all the characters, we see in each of them, even Helena, examples of human beings like all others, who evince a combination of good and bad traits as they pass across life s stage.The King says, in the EpilogueThe King s a beggar, now the play is done.All is well ended, if this suit be won,That you express content which we will pay,With strife to please you, day exceeding day.Ours be your patience then, and yours our parts.Your gentle hands lend us, and take our hearts.This rather enigmatic speech does nothing to dispel a feeling of evening falling, life winding down as ever.Comedy More like a tragi comedy


  3. says:

    All s well that ends wellsure, but does it really end well Really A simple maid with the one remedy for what ails the king, cures him and receives as her reward the hand in marriage of a high born courtier The groom to be won t submit to wed such a lowly personage, nay His refusal is seen as base and tarnishes his reputation, so he flees to the wars, for it is through deeds of bravery that he will redeem himself Slight of hand and high japery set the scene for misunderstandings and tricky All s well that ends wellsure, but does it really end well Really A simple maid with the one remedy for what ails the king, cures him and receives as her reward the hand in marriage of a high born courtier The groom to be won t submit to wed such a lowly personage, nay His refusal is seen as base and tarnishes his reputation, so he flees to the wars, for it is through deeds of bravery that he will redeem himself Slight of hand and high japery set the scene for misunderstandings and tricky ruse de guerre in the realm of romance Will they or won t they A very fairytale story, that Shakespeare tries to transform it into something arealistic, but in the process creates a strange brew of the two What never rises above the land of make believe, imo, is that the simple maid ever finds attractive and purposefully pursues the asshole groom to be This portion of All s Well That Ends Well parallels the Lizzy and Darcy struggle from Pride and Prejudice, except that it never quite makes enough to sense to satisfy this reader Shakespeare fails to bring the couple together in a realistic way In the end it s a flippant one liner that switches hate to love Is this a cop out A comedy shortcut Or just poor writing Maybe it doesn t really matter, because quite clearly this framework is meant to be a vehicle for the comedy strewn about the middle of the play I used quotations around comedy, because I m sarcastic like that While cowardice can be comical, I don t find kidnapping, hostage threats of torture and death, and weaselly traitorous admissions to be hilarious good funwell, for a little while, maybe The scene with Parolles drags on and on, and we get it right off the bat, the guy s a coward Yes, this scene is important for the big reveal at the end, but man does it go on too long It s failures like the above that kept me from loving this play like I have others It s not bad, just not brilliant


  4. says:

    Love all, trust a few, do wrong to noneWilliam Shakespeare, All s Well That Ends WellThe most clearly problematic of Shakespeare s Problem Plays Don t get me wrong I love the dark, ambiguous, almost nihilistically modern tone of this period of Shakespeare I think the peak of the three plays is clearly 1st Measure for Measure, followed by 2nd Troilus and Cressida, and 3rd lastly, this.To bastardize a line from Shakespeare s M4M to fit my cause and purposeThey say, best men plays aLove all, trust a few, do wrong to noneWilliam Shakespeare, All s Well That Ends WellThe most clearly problematic of Shakespeare s Problem Plays Don t get me wrong I love the dark, ambiguous, almost nihilistically modern tone of this period of Shakespeare I think the peak of the three plays is clearly 1st Measure for Measure, followed by 2nd Troilus and Cressida, and 3rd lastly, this.To bastardize a line from Shakespeare s M4M to fit my cause and purposeThey say, best men plays are moulded out of faults, And, for the most, become muchthe better For being a little bad Anyway, one of the redemptions of All s Well is Shakespeare is playing us and not just the players He KNOWS audiences want resolution He KNOWS it pays to let the boy get the girl Hell, movies today show we are no different We don t want ambiguity too much We want a hero who gets the girl Shakespeare says fine I ll give you a nominal hero who in reality is a real dick and feed him per request to the girl She will get what she wants in the end and the audience will get what they essentially keep demanding in the end And the result will be bitter To again paraphrase H.L Mencken who was talking about voters and democracy, fits also for theatre patrons Shakespeare knowsthat the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hardIt is all very modern of Shakespeare and also very human Just not humane.Onepoint about this play I adore Parolles He isn t nearly as perfect as Iago later will be, but like Lucio from M4M and Thersites in TC carries some of the best lines in the play.Some of my favorite lines just a brief sampleModerate lamentation is the right of the dead,excessive grief the enemy to the livingAct 1, Scene 1my idolatrous fancy Must sanctify his reliquesAct 1, Scene 1When thou hast leisure, say thy prayers When thou hast none, remember thy friendsAct 1, Scene 1Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie, Which we ascribe to heavenAct 1, Scene 1see that you come Not to woo honour, but to wed itAct 2, Scene 1My art is not past power, nor you past cureAct 2, Scene 1Hence is it that we make trifles of terrors, ensconcing ourselves into seeming knowledge when we should submit ourselves to an unknown fearAct 2, Scene 3


  5. says:

    Where can you go after writing Hamlet Only into the bitterest depths of irony and nihilism, apparently All s Well That Ends Well is part of the problem play trilogy that followed soon after the Danish Prince s demise and Malvolio s humiliation, and it appears on the surface to be less twisted than both Troilus and Cressida and Measure for Measure But don t be fooled Shakespeare plays one of his greatest tricks on the audience here, achieving something difficult and deeply unsatisfying, which Where can you go after writing Hamlet Only into the bitterest depths of irony and nihilism, apparently All s Well That Ends Well is part of the problem play trilogy that followed soon after the Danish Prince s demise and Malvolio s humiliation, and it appears on the surface to be less twisted than both Troilus and Cressida and Measure for Measure But don t be fooled Shakespeare plays one of his greatest tricks on the audience here, achieving something difficult and deeply unsatisfying, which probably explains this play s lack of staging popularity See, we like Helena Shakespeare wins our sympathy for her early and often, but he also has her fall in love with Bertram, one of the shallowest d bags the Bard has to offer Harold Bloom points out that nearly all Shakespeare s women marry beneath themselves, but the Helena Bertram coupling might be the most egregious in the canon Even so, why is this such a problem for the audience Well, the plot focuses almost entirely on Helena s pursuit of Bertram via means elaborate and occasionally of questionable ethics but we don t care because we like Helena , and we can t help but root for her success Yet and here s the trick this success wins her the shittiest prize ever, someone that will make her life miserable I m not exaggerating Bertram wants nothing to do with Helena and tells her as much at regular interval He s a hopelessly immature, warmongering slut, hanging around with the scoundrel Parolles, who manages to berelatable if not likable than Bertram following his acceptance of public disgrace and dispossession But we ve probably all had a friend like Helena, someone whose imagination Carries no favour in t but Bertram s , who falls for someone we can t stand Such is life, such is love And it s worse Helena knows that Bertram is bad news But, O strange men That can such sweet use make of what they hate,When saucy trusting of the cozen d thoughtsDefiles the pitchy night so lust doth playWith what it loathes for that which is away And yet she keeps holding on to that belief all s well that ends well Ah, but who else can believe it So bitter, Shakespeare


  6. says:

    . 4 30 2013 4 30 2013 15 2017 D


  7. says:

    Totu i bine c nd se sf r e te bine , piesa lui Shakespeare, este o tragedie evitat n ultimul moment a se consemna Poate din pricina asta, critica literar consider piesa o comedie E drept c titlul ofer , aparent, nuan e comice, ns eu n am v zut niciun dram de comic n pies Este mai degrab o drama a c rei ultima scen al ultimului act este comic deoarece to i sunt mp ca i.Nuan ele dramatice ale piesei ce pot fi sesizate abia ast zi, iar nu n epoca lui Shakespeare sunt dat Totu i bine c nd se sf r e te bine , piesa lui Shakespeare, este o tragedie evitat n ultimul moment a se consemna Poate din pricina asta, critica literar consider piesa o comedie E drept c titlul ofer , aparent, nuan e comice, ns eu n am v zut niciun dram de comic n pies Este mai degrab o drama a c rei ultima scen al ultimului act este comic deoarece to i sunt mp ca i.Nuan ele dramatice ale piesei ce pot fi sesizate abia ast zi, iar nu n epoca lui Shakespeare sunt date de genialele ipostaze ale discrepan ei dintre clase, a prejudec ilor aristocratice ale epocii medievalePecete a adev rurilor firiiE n tinere e ghimpele iubirii Caracterul feciorelnic al femeii medievale, lipsite de mijloace materiale, singura ei avere Dar c ndCuleas i roza i r m n doar spinii,Pe noi ne n eap , i voi face i hazDe jaful ce ne a pustiit n antitez cu o insinuare m r av a lui Parollesi nu s a n scut nicio fecioara p n nu s a pierdut o feciorie Metalul din care e ti tu f cut e bun pentru turnat fecioare Prin faptul c i o pierzi o dat , fecioria poate fi re nnoit n alte zece exemplare A ine partea fecioriei nseamn s i nvinov e ti mama, care i a pierdut o ca s te fac Dimensiunea hiperbolic a limbajuluiAm s i spun un lucru, dar s l ngropi n ine c t po i de ad nc ndat ce mi l vei spune, va muri, i eu voi fi morm ntul lui P.S., spre ru inea mea, e prima pies scris de Shakespeare pe care o citesc i de aceea nu m pot pronun a mai academic Oricum, p n la finele anului, mi am propus s citesc opera complet sper doar s mi ajung TIMPUL Andrei Tama , 19 februarie 2016


  8. says:

    ALright, obviously I am biased being that I will be playing the heroine May through Septemberbut before all that, when I first read this play last winter it became my favorite play by Shakespeare This is the best edition f the play, and has a brilliant introduction Helena is the first female physician ever created, and her strength, daring, and unabashed lack of self respect where her feelings for Bertram are concerned make her a fascinating subject and a great role model in many ways Th ALright, obviously I am biased being that I will be playing the heroine May through Septemberbut before all that, when I first read this play last winter it became my favorite play by Shakespeare This is the best edition f the play, and has a brilliant introduction Helena is the first female physician ever created, and her strength, daring, and unabashed lack of self respect where her feelings for Bertram are concerned make her a fascinating subject and a great role model in many ways This play was the warm up piece for Measure for Measure in many ways, as it is where Willy worked out the infamous bed trick, and between the speeches of the Countess and the King, contains some of thebeautiful musings on love, youth, and age that I have ever read or heard I think that this play has the ability to truly reach people, and if you can t come see it this summereven if you can you should definitely check it out


  9. says:

    Summary Set in France and Italy, All s Well That Ends Well is a story of one sided romance, based on a tale from Boccaccio s The Decameron.Helen, orphaned daughter of a doctor, is under the protection of the widowed Countess of Rossillion.In love with Bertram, the countess son, Helen follows him to court, where she cures the sick French king of an apparently fatal illness.The king rewards Helen by offering her the husband of her choice She names Bertram he resists.When forced by the king to Summary Set in France and Italy, All s Well That Ends Well is a story of one sided romance, based on a tale from Boccaccio s The Decameron.Helen, orphaned daughter of a doctor, is under the protection of the widowed Countess of Rossillion.In love with Bertram, the countess son, Helen follows him to court, where she cures the sick French king of an apparently fatal illness.The king rewards Helen by offering her the husband of her choice She names Bertram he resists.When forced by the king to marry her, he refuses to sleep with her and, accompanied by the braggart Parolles, leaves for the Italian wars.He says that he will only accept Helen if she obtains a ring from his finger and becomes pregnant with his child.She goes to Italy disguised as a pilgrim and suggests a bed trick whereby she will take the place of Diana, a widow s daughter whom Bertram is trying to seduce.A kidnapping trick humiliates the boastful Parolles, whilst the bed trick enables Helen to fulfil Bertram s conditions, leaving him no option but to marry her, to his mother s delight This is not my favorite Shakespeare work but still a very engaging story I especially enjoy a modern presentation of the work


  10. says:

    I believe some one who reads my reviews wanted me not to spoil this play well I m gonna, so stop reading now if you don t want to know any plot details This is considered one of the problem play, as far as I can tell, because it doesn t really fit neatly into any of the standard genres of the period It certainly isn t Tragedy or History and despite having an irrelevant and silly side plot in the vein of Much Ado About Nothing or Twelfth Night, it doesn t really hold up as a Comedy in the se I believe some one who reads my reviews wanted me not to spoil this play well I m gonna, so stop reading now if you don t want to know any plot details This is considered one of the problem play, as far as I can tell, because it doesn t really fit neatly into any of the standard genres of the period It certainly isn t Tragedy or History and despite having an irrelevant and silly side plot in the vein of Much Ado About Nothing or Twelfth Night, it doesn t really hold up as a Comedy in the sense of those plays either Why not For me at least, because everybody involved isor less playing a manipulative game that makes them unsympathetic in my eyes I suppose one is supposed to root for Helen who fancies a man above her station and eventually gets him but that man doesn t want her and she wins him by any means except gaining his affections honestly First she gets the King to arrange the marriage, then she tricks him into impregnating her Not really the kind of woman I appreciate.Then the husband is status obsessed, unable to appreciate virtue or talent and he defies the King over the marriage, which he is forced to go through with but he s a bit hypocritical and falls for the same bed trick as goes down in Measure for Measure.Eventually everything is wrapped up in a neat bow but one has to question whether there s really going to be a happily ever after in that household, given all the deceit and dislike that forms its foundation.Heavily prose driven, the language is not that fabulous compared to the astonishing MacBeth which I read immediately previously, which just leaves the aforementioned daft subplot to amuse me Not a great success

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *